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Cops: Escaped prisoner kills officer Curtis Allgier, 27, is taken away in the back of a police car from a fast food restaurant after being captured Monday, in Salt Lake City. The prison inmate taken to the University of Utah for a medical appointment Monday stole a gun from a corrections officer and fatally shot him, authorities said. Allgier fled the scene on foot, carjacked a Ford Explorer and was captured miles away at an Arby’s restaurant after a high-speed chase. Cops: Escaped prisoner kills officer

AP Photo
VIENNA, Austria Nuke group heading to Iran

Acting on a request from Iran, the International Atomic Energy Agency said Monday it will send a team to Tehran to work jointly on a plan meant to clear up suspicions about the Islamic republic’s nuclear activities.

The invitation, conveyed Sunday by a senior Iranian envoy and made public Monday by the agency, was portrayed by some diplomats as a positive step in IAEA attempts to learn more about past activities that could point toward a weapons program.

But the U.S. said it was skeptical.

If followed through, it could generate international good will that might blunt the threat of new U.N. sanctions and increase pressure on the U.S. and its closest allies to compromise on their insistence for a full enrichment freeze.

WASHINGTON Lawsuit over pants rejected

A judge ruled Monday that no pair of pants is worth $54 million, rejecting a lawsuit that took a dry cleaner’s promise of “Satisfaction Guaranteed” to its most litigious extreme.

Roy L. Pearson became a worldwide symbol of legal abuse by seeking jackpot justice from a simple complaint — that a neighborhood dry cleaners lost the pants from a new suit and tried to give him a pair that were not his.

His claim, reduced from $67 million, was based on a strict interpretation of the city’s consumer protection law — which imposes fines of $1,500 per violation, per day — as well as damages for inconvenience, mental anguish and attorney’s fees for representing himself.

RICHFIELD, Minn. Iwo Jima flag raiser dies

Charles W. Lindberg, one of the U.S. Marines who raised the first American flag over Iwo Jima during World War II, has died. He was 86.

Lindberg died Sunday at Fairview Southdale hospital in the Minneapolis suburb of Edina, said John Pose, director of the Morris Nilsen Funeral Home in Richfield.

Lindberg spent decades explaining that it was his patrol, not the one captured in the famous Associated Press photograph by Joe Rosenthal, that raised the first flag as U.S. forces fought to take the Japanese island.

In the late morning of Feb. 23, 1945, Lindberg fired his flame-thrower into enemy pillboxes at the base of Mount Suribachi and then joined five other Marines fighting their way to the top. He was awarded the Silver Star for bravery.

NEWARK, N.J. Gay kiss stirs controversy

The school district said Monday it regretted ordering a picture of a male student kissing his boyfriend blacked out from all copies of a high school yearbook and said it apologized to the student.

Andre Jackson, the student, said he was disappointed that the superintendent had not delivered the apology face-to-face and in public.

“I would accept an apology — a public apology,” said Jackson, 18.

Jackson said he learned of the apology through the media.

The district issued a statement Monday saying it regretted the decision and that it would issue an unredacted version of the yearbook to any student of East Side High School who wants one.

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